One thought on “Navajo leader backs banning environmentalists from reservation; native journo questions MSM coverage

  1. Robert – Regarding Mary Pember’s piece containing the Shebala comment you noted: Two questions immediately come to mind when reading Pember’s piece. 1) Why did she not begin its first sentence with “Smog hangs over the Grand Canyon, mostly the result of a nearby forest fire”?, and 2) Is it her intention to suggest visible smog from the Navajo Generating Station increases in density over areas like the Grand Canyon, when no such smoke is seen immediately above its stacks, as seen in the photo at the USA Today link you provided (or seen daily by motorists driving through the Page area)?

    Interesting echo chamber effect when both Ms Pember and Ms Shebala speak about lazy journalists’ treatment of news from Indian Country, along with Brenda Norrell’s Oct 1 ‘journalists regurgitate Navajo press release’ story, titled “Lazy Journalists are the Darlings of the Corporations”: http://www.counterpunch.org/norrell10012009.html

    Shebala’s quote is worth repeating, “There is a big difference between elected leadership and traditional leadership in Indian Country; reporters need to know this and dig deeper into the community when reporting on political issues. Journalists would never assume that the mayor of a city or governor of a state speaks for the entire population.” Add to that Norrell’s gripe about simply regurgitating lines from top leaders, “Too often, this means publishing the lies of politicians and corporations. It is censorship, silencing the voices of the people.”

    Yet do we see environmental journalists deeper into the community of IPCC scientists, National Academy of Scientists’ members, American Geophysical Union members, and American Chemical Society members, when each group’s leaders or spokespersons make statements about global warming that the rank-and-file don’t agree with? Are you able to cite any instances of in-depth analysis of that in the mainstream media?