As Alaska’s deadliest catches become more regulated, “Slipper Skippers” exploit those who actually fish

Halibut fishing is cold, hard work, but lacks the TV-ready sex appeal of Alaskan crab.
Courtesy of Lee van der Voo.

Before you feel sorry for anybody in this story, meet Jared Bright. And remember your first impression, because he’s eventully going to call himself a serf. For the moment, he’s just a guy you’re about to get jealous of. That’s because he’s 38 years old, and industry sources say he’s worth about $2 million.

Between his ordinary upbringing in Ketchikan, Alaska, and the day Bright invested in his fishing boat, there was no winning lottery ticket, no trust fund. He’s just a fisherman; been one for 21 years. And lucky for him, he happens to be good at it. If he can keep the bearded men in the embroidered shirts out of his game, he’s going to be even better.

But before we get into the bearded men, get rid of the image of the Gorton’s fisherman. Forget the fish sticks, the wooden captain’s wheel, and that wholesome picture of the guy on the yellow box. Instead, put yourself on one side of the Whole Foods fish counter, a chunk of halibut in the middle—price tag: $28 a pound—and think of Bright as the guy on the other side, the guy who’s going to get it to you. Think six feet two inches of lean muscle, pierced ears, and an auburn mug and sideburns, dressed in black North Face and talking like 10 cups of coffee while texting on a smartphone.

This is your fisherman. You are as likely to see him driving around West Seattle in his Smart Car as out on the open ocean. And if you thought The Deadliest Catch was wild, the game he plays to bring you this latest item in white-tablecloth seafood is even weirder.